Tag Archives: composting

4 Surprising “Green” Chicago Websites

1. The above picture isn’t a mockup of some lofty futuristic eco-architecture. It is now and it’s Chicago’s City Hall. If you’ve never explored Chicago’s Green Roofs project, you’re in for some surprises. For instance, did you know that nestled in that photo above are beehives that produce salable honey? If you’re curious about which city rooftops are green (or where to buy some of that honey) check out the city’s Green Roofs page or take your binoculars up to the Skydeck of Willis Tower and see for yourself.

2. A little more visible from our vantage point are the city’s Green Alleys projects. Chicago’s Department of Transportation began the green alleys pilot project in 2006 and renovated more than 100 alleys by 2010. What is a green alley? Check out the city’s comprehensive and well-illustrated Green Alley Handbook. Who knew your back alley could be a marvel of modern eco engineering. By the way, there’s a lot more to these alleys than just pretty landscaping. Take a look.

3. Being a relative newcomer to Chicago, I was very pleasantly surprised by the city’s incredibly progressive Sustainable Backyard Program. Residents can get cash rebates from the city for buying rain barrels, compost bins, native plants and trees from local retailers. A great way to help the environment while supporting local business and spending more time outdoors. Unless extended, the rebate program runs until 12/31/2012 so make this your year for creating a more sustainable backyard. Oh, and if you’re a retailer wanting to learn more about getting involved with the rebate program, consider attending the upcoming workshop on March 1st.

4. Finally, to learn more about any green & growing topic imaginable, check out the list of free and low-fee workshops offered by the Chicago Center for Green Technology. Learn about anything from how to install green countertops to finding out how the city uses vegetable oil from local restaurants to produce biofuel. Their building also contains a staffed resource center and free exhibits throughout the year.

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Rooftop Composting & End of Days

Hey Chicago, look what you can do:

It’s a rainy gray day in Chicago, which is good because I’ve stopped irrigation on the rooftop. We went out of town last week and I decided the tomatoes would have to fend for themselves. I’m ready to let the garden wind down on its own.

I didn’t end up buying a composter or vermi-poster for the rooftop this season for two reasons: weight and odor. I want to try vermicomposting in the worst way, but I’m concerned that the high temps on the roof will cook the worms and give off a disastrous odor. I also have weight anxiety. I tracked down our building’s developer and only received a vague answer as to the type of roof construction and weight load this building can handle. I think we’ll end up hiring  a structural engineer from one of those rooftop gardening companies that have popped up around Chicago. At least that will stop the visions of planter boxes crashing down on the living room. Exhibit A, an Illinois green roof.

To [potentially] solve the anxiety problem, this season I have been putting all the composting material in garbage bags, spraying in some water, and closing them with just a small air hole. This way I can control the amount of weight concentrating in one area, control the odor by either double-bagging or throwing away certain bags and not have to worry about acomposter overflowing or worms dying. Of course, I’d scrap this method in a second once I determine the weight load of my roof.

So gardeners, what are you going to do now that the season is ending? Indoor gardening? Planning for next season? I’m planning on trying my hand at growing epiphytes from seed (dragon fruit producing varieties), winter sprouting, and finish up a terrarium project. I’ll keep ya’ posted!