Tag Archives: indoor gardening

Reader Profile: Small Space Indoor Gardening in Chicagoland

This week Kim Slavenski of Naperville, IL kindly shared  photos of his indoor garden. Kim recently moved into a third floor apartment where he undertook the experiment of trying vermiculture and indoor container gardening. Vermiculture, if you’re unfamiliar, is the art and science of keeping earthworms in a container to make use of their excellent waste recycling and compost benefits.

Kim explained, “I purchased a couple pounds of worms last year. Now I feed the worms cardboard and my garbage. I feed their castings to my tabletop garden.”

Kim must have a good system going, just look at the results of his experiment:

If you have any questions or comments for Kim, please feel welcome to leave them below or email me and I’ll be sure they reach her. wickerrooftop@gmail.com

Gallery

Indoor Winter Projects With Succulents and Tropicals

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Throughout the 1960’s and 1970’s, houseplants in America were at a peak of popularity. The 1980’s reigned in the “me generation” that didn’t have time for living things. Dusty plastic ficus replaced macrame hangers and avocado trees. In the 1990’s … Continue reading

Here’s What’s Growing 6/2/11

I haven’t been posting much about the rooftop situation out of pure shame and embarrassment. I was mislead by a few nice days in mid-May to think I could plan my SIPs. Then the weather got weird; warm season veggies got too cold and otherwise hardy veggies were shredded by high winds.

Three tomatoes survived and now have stems that could survive a hurricane. Most of the pak choi survived (pictured below). Peas did great.  The rest of the vacancies were replaced this week by heirlooms I bought at Gethsemene Gardens or leftover seedlings I kept indoors. Tomorrow I’m heading to Portland, OR for a week so these babies better learn to get along without me.

Here’s a look at what’s up:

 

 

 

pak choi

 

 

 

 

 

SIPs well-staked and bamboo-d

 

 

 

Micro-irrigation kit in place for my upcoming week out-of-town

 

 

 

 

Very hardy and prolific Dwarf Gray peas

 

 

 

 

First meal of indoor-grown baby Asian greens

 

 

I have a couple hundred amaranth seedlings I’m not quite sure what to do with. Lots of pho’ I guess.

 

 

 

Not bad for an $8 rose bush from English Gardens in Royal Oak, MI, eh?

A gardening incident in 10 parts. Plus, the 7 stages of (seed) recovery.

Part 1. Chicago got a lot of rain over the past few days

Part 2. My indoor crate full of gardening supplies was temporarily placed outside on Thursday to make room for patio furniture being hauled up to the roof.

Part 3. Saturday is a nice day to garden so I go up to the roof and find my indoor crate still outdoors.

Part 4. Stage 1. Discovery: I opened up the crate to find my box full of 2010 and 2011 seed packets. Oh yeah, that’s where I put those!

Part 5. Stage 2. Revelation: Said seed packets were floating in rain water. Or, as a smarter gardener would have it, pre-soaking for germination.

Part 6. Stage 3. Contemplation: Spent Saturday getting creative. How to accommodate more babies than my nursery could possibly have room for.

Part 7. Stage 4. Acceptance: Can’t possibly plant them all- we will be eating sprouts and baby greens with every meal for the next 2 months.

Part 8. Stage 5. Preparation: Amassed every unused container I could find including cookie sheets and baking dishes.

Part 9. Stage 6. Action: Sprouting plantable seeds in paper towel for transplant once I get more containers. Combined peas and beans and squash for salad sprouts. Planted trays for baby green and herb mix.

Part 10. Stage 7. Change: Lesson learned. Pledge to develop a better seed saving procedure for this fall. Pledge to not leave stuff out in the rain.

My rooftop project is now no longer just a rooftop project. It is now also a living room project and a sprouting project. It’s Sunday and I just finished prepping all EarthBoxes for rooftop planting- may have to risk planting earlier than May 15 and so far the forecast is looking good. Stay tuned…